Month 4 – Exercise Ideas

Individual Exercise Goals

Exercise is an important part of being healthy. Below you'll find the 
guidelines for how much exercise you should be aiming for each day and week.

150 minutes per week cardio exercise

Cardio Level:

Moderate Intensity

Cardio Level:

Moderate Intensity

30 minutes per day 5 d/week

or

3 x 10 minute sessions per day
is acceptable

or

60 minutes per week cardio exercise

Cardio Level:

Vigorous Intensity

Cardio Level:

Vigorous Intensity

20 minute
session 3 d/week

or

2 x 10 minute sessions 3 d/week

+

2-3 days per week
resistance training

Resistance Exercise

Major muscle groups.
Two to four sets of each exercise.
Reps between 8 – 20 each exercise.

+

2-3 days per week flexibility training

Flexibilty Exercise

Each stretch held 10 – 30 seconds.
Repeat each stretch 2-4 times, accumulating 60 seconds per stretch.

or

Neuromotor exercise
(Functional Fitness Training)

for older adults

Neuromotor Exercise

2-3 days per week for older adults. Exercises to improve balance, agility, gait and coordination (e.g. yoga). Aim is to improve physical function and prevent falls in older adults. Between 20-30 minutes per day is appropriate.

Exercise Examples

Below are some examples of the types of exercise that you can do to meet our recommendations.
The most important thing about exercise is to do what you enjoy. It is more important to do something rather than nothing!

Image

Cardio Exercise


Bodyweight Cardio
Walking, running,
swimming, cycling


Machine based exercises
(gym based)
Rowing, elliptical trainer,
cross trainer


CrossFit style work outs
Body weight WOD
HIIT training


Aerobic classes
Spin class
Aqua aerobics

Image

Resistance Exercise


Bodyweight Exercises
Squats, lunges, push ups


Machine based exercises
(gym based)
Leg press, hamstring curl,
bench press, shoulder press,
lat pull down, seated row


CrossFit style work outs
Kettle bells, barbells with
weights, wall balls


Aerobic classes
Bodypump, or any gym class
with weights

Image

Flexibility Exercise


Bodyweight Flexibility
Any form of stretching
– stretching major muscles like quadriceps (thigh), hamstrings, shoulders,
triceps, biceps


Aerobic classes
Yoga
Pilates

Image

Neuromotor Exercise


Exercises for older people
Yoga, Pilates & Tai Chi

Track Your Exercise

The Cronometer app lets you track and log your exercise. There is a large database of different types of exercise and lifestyle activities within the app that you can log. Cronometer also syncs with Fitbit and Google Fit.
Image

Logging Exercise

Click the + button and click ‘add exercise’

Calories Burned from Exercise

Harvard Health recently put together a list of calories burned from various exercises based on three
different weight categories. Here are their examples:

Mental Health

In addition to nutrition and exercise, The Food Cruncher supports mental health and wellbeing as part of your overall health and wellness strategy.

Now, we’re not doctors, counsellors or therapists, so please do seek specialist help for any mental health support you need. That said, we’ve got a whole lot of life experience that could be of help for your mental health and we also know how food can affect it.

Below are some tips on how to include mental health as part of your complete health and wellness plan. We hope they help, and as always, please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions. The team at The Food Cruncher is here to support you.

Nutrition & Depression:

There is growing evidence of the benefits of certain nutrients to help fight depression.
Some examples of foods that have shown to act as antidepressants include:

Image

Watercress

Image

Lettuce & Spinach

Image

Fresh herbs
(basil & parsley)

Image

Peppers / Capsicum

Image

Kale

Image

Pumpkin

Image

Broccoli

Image

Lemons

Image

Strawberries

Image

Shellfish (clams, crabs, oyster)

Image

Salmon

Image

Snapper

Including a wide variety of vegetables daily in your diet will be beneficial not only to your mental health and wellbeing, but also to your more general health and in helping to prevent other lifestyle diseases such as type II diabetes and cancer.

Note that The Food Cruncher has a specific programme aimed at Nutrition & Depression prevention.

Stress:

It is well known that stress is not good for health. Stress comes from many areas. Symptoms of stress might include:

  • Constant eating
  • No appetite
  • Worrying a lot
  • Bad-tempered, grumpy, miserable
  • No energy
  • Don’t want to go outside
  • Trouble with concentration and making decisions
  • Poor sleep
  • Feeling sad and/or tearful
  • Wanting to sleep all the time

Tips for reducing stress:

Meditation:

There are lots of benefits of meditation and often people meditate to manage stress, reduce anxiety and to have peace of mind. Meditation is about training in awareness and achieving a healthy sense of perspective. It is not about ‘turning off’ your thoughts or feelings, rather learning to observe them without judgement.

One Minute Meditation

  • Find a comfortable seated position (this can be anywhere, from your home, office, outdoors or even in your car).
  • Close your eyes and focus on breathing.
  • Focus on counting your breaths. Allow yourself to deeply drop into your mind and body for one whole minute.

Even a one-minute meditation such as this can help you let go of stress and create a calmer state of mind.

The Food Cruncher recognizes the work of Headspace.com. Headspace is an organization committed to providing authentic expertise in meditation and also studying the science of meditation itself.